Not So Hero(in) the Suburbs – Part 1

Photo by: Viktorija Bieksaite

by Juliana Evans
News writer

   In the last couple years, Heroin use in suburb areas including DuPage County has skyrocketed. It has become an issue in many local high schools and as result; many parents are struggling with the loss of a child due to a hidden addiction.
   Young modern users mistakenly believe addiction and overdose are less likely since the drug is now available in powder form not requiring injection. They could not be more wrong.
   Drug use in Illinois as a whole has been a devastating problem. In an article by Quan Truong published in the Chicago Tribune, officials of Roosevelt University’s Illinois Consortium on Drug Policy exclaimed, “More people die from drug overdose deaths than car accidents.”
   The unusual aspect of this drug is that it’s being consumed by all walks of life. Current overdoses have included people of all ages and backgrounds. Users range from as young as high school freshman, to as old as grandparents. Heroin is even gaining popularity amongst athletes and honor roll students.
   In order to new users hooked, dealers have made it extensively accessible. Highway I-88 which connects many surrounding towns directly leads to Chicago’s west side; home to many heroin suppliers. Along with just a short drive, dealers are selling heroin at prices easily affordable.
   This drug is heavily popular for teens considering it is a hard drug that is sold cheaper than most. A typical dose of heroin that is purchased costs around $10. Above all, cases of dealers giving it out free of charge are occurring because they are aware of the dependence the user may develop.
   Mexican organized crime organizations are partly responsible for the increased availability of this drug, which is being smuggled across the American boarder and distributed by American-based gangs. And while recent seizures indicate the purity of the Heroin sold in the U.S. may be increasing, the price of the drug is decreasing.
   When any person begins his or her interaction with this drug, it’s very difficult to regain a normal, sober life. In a recent mySuburbanLife.com article, DuPage County Coroner Richard Jorgensen stated, “Eventually, all people that are involved in serious drugs, and especially heroin, devolve in to a very, very serious spiral that ends up either in rehabilitation if you’re lucky, our criminal justice system if you’re also lucky, or death.”
   As of today, a person dies of heroin overdose every eight days in DuPage County alone. And the current wave of overdoses shows no sign of letting up anytime soon.

Read the second article of this two-part series: Home Is Where the Heroin Is? – Part 2
Read the third article of this three-part series: Help For Heroin – Part 3

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4 Comments on “Not So Hero(in) the Suburbs – Part 1”

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Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Home Is Where the Heroin Is? – Part 2 | Tom Tom - December 1, 2013

    […] the first article of this three-part series: Not So Hero(in) the Suburbs – Part 1 Read the third article of this three-part series: Help For Heroin – Part […]

  2. Help for Heroin – Part 3 | Tom Tom - December 1, 2013

    […] the first article in this three-part series: Not So Hero(in) the Suburbs – Part 1 Read the second article in this three-part series: Home Is Where the Heroin Is? – Part […]

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